Tag Archive | "Andrea Kooiman"

Andrea Kooiman AC 100 Trail Work

Am I a Real Runner?

Am I a Real Runner?

When did you realize you were a real runner? Such an odd question to ask of someone, but I have been asked it many times. I have actually gone to battle with myself over this question and had difficulty finding the answer when trying to justify it to others.

I guess in order to answer the question; you must first understand what a “real runner” is.

Dictonary.com defines the words like this:

Runner:
a person who runs, especially in a specified way.
“Mary was a fast runner”

Real:
actually existing as a thing or occurring in fact; not imagined or supposed.
“Julius Caesar was a real person”

So, based on the definitions, I guess the day I became a “real runner” was the day I hit the ground running. Each time I ran, whether for sport, to get to something faster (or maybe get away from something more quickly), I was running in a specified way. Just by the act of doing it, it became real. More importantly though, is the moment when I “owned” the title for myself. The day I decided that I in fact was a runner. That moment did not come until years after taking my first “running” steps. As I write this, I know that deep down I still struggle with the definition and what it means on a much grander scale.

Let’s rewind to my youth. I loved sports, I loved being outside and I loved a good dose of healthy competition. I wanted to win. It didn’t matter what it was, I wanted to give it a shot and I wanted to be the best at it. I had drive (some would say, I still do). I ran a few youth track meets and enjoyed the thrill of the chase and of course the recognition of a podium finish. As I entered high school, I ran with the cross country team, but to be honest, I only joined because the boy I liked was on the team. I was not a fast runner, but held my own for a few years until I lost interest in the sport. I still loved to run. I ran for fitness through early adulthood and would enter the occasional local 10K. It was my sanity at times, my reset button. It was my freedom.

It wasn’t until 2005 when a co-worker, friend and retired ultra-runner challenged me to run my first marathon. I took her up on the challenge and trained with her for 6 months. I ran my first marathon in January 2006 at the Orange County Marathon event. It was amazing. I must have liked it because the year I ran my first marathon, I ended up running three. The year 2006 is when I feel I started my official running journey. Instead of running for fitness only, I was running to complete a series of goals. I began coaching a youth marathon program and found new and interesting ways to insert my life into the running community.

With this new found passion for running and racing, I began to set more and more goals. Places I would like to run, PR’s I would like to set and distances I wanted to conquer. This was a transitional phase for me as I learned how remarkable my body was. I wanted to push harder, I wanted to run faster and eventually I wanted to run farther. A LOT FARTHER!

Here is where my “real runner” phase really begins to kick in. Maybe it was the pressure I placed on myself, or the comparisons I made when meeting other runners, but there was a need for validation in what I was doing. Each and every time I stood at a starting line, I always felt a bit inferior to the others, almost as if I didn’t belong there. This feeling didn’t start to take shape until my goals became more out of the ordinary like when I wanted to stack up back to back races, or run distances of 100 miles. While trying to qualify for Boston, I was reading The Ultra Marathon Man by Dean Karnazes. He speaks about Western States 100 and Badwater 135 in the book. Both of those races seemed far out of reach at that time, but as I progressed in my running and as my hunger for more difficult challenges could not be satisfied, these races became my goals that kept pushing me. They became my desire. I needed to go for it. With that, I started to sign up for races that would help me achieve my goal. Badwater was first on the list. I knew I needed at minimum three 100 mile races completed before I would be considered as an applicant. I also knew that I needed to crew/pace at the event to determine whether or not I should actually go through with this crazy idea that had started to consume my mind. I had already completed two 100 mile races, but they were on loop courses. I wanted to add some trail races to my resume so that it would look better when submitting for Badwater. I registered for the Angeles Crest 100, Leadville 100, Endurance Challenge 100 and Chimera 100. By finishing these, my resume would certainly have the minimum three 100 mile finishes I needed (and then some).

The Angeles Crest 100 Miler was first up and I needed to complete required trail work in order to be allowed to start the race. The day of my trail work, I was partnered up with many highly seasoned ultra runners to do trail maintenance. Many of these runners had run not only the AC100 course a number of times, but had completed dozens of other trail races that I had only heard about. I loved hearing their stories. I wanted to ask them so many questions about trail racing but didn’t want to seem stupid or too eager.

During the course of the trail work I learned so much valuable information from this experienced ultra vets. However, during that time, one of the guys made me feel very bad. While we were discussing upcoming races he mentioned that he would be at Leadville. I was going to be there too! It happened to be just two weeks after AC100. I spoke up, how exciting we would both be racing these two events so close together! He looked me straight in the face and asked how I thought I could pull that off without having any 100 mile trail race finishes under my belt. I felt foolish. The truth is, I really hadn’t thought about it. I just knew I wanted to do it and the only way to reach my goal is to take the start line.

I was too naive to know the difference until he pointed it out. It didn’t matter to me when I signed up for them. My goal was my goal, and I was on my way to achieving it. The only problem with his comment, is that I began to doubt myself. I believe that you should go into every race with a respect for the distance and the course. It is important to go into an event with the ability to SEE the finish line. Picture yourself there. Visualize the medal, buckle or whatever it is that they give to you upon completion. You need to be able to see your completion of the race. Own it. It needs to be YOURS! Until this moment, AC100 was going to be my first trail 100 finish.

Now, well…..now I wasn’t so sure. Maybe he was right? What made me think I could pull this off?

AC100 came and went. I missed the time cutoff at mile 52 and therefore did not finish AC. My first DNF! I could go into a long story about all that happened, but the truth is, I gave up mentally. I didn’t think so at the time, but after the tears had dried and the dirt was washed away, the harsh reality stared me in the face. I gave up on myself. I doubted myself. I didn’t feel like I belonged there and now in two more weeks I was going to do it again, but this time at 10,000+ feet in Leadville, Colorado.

What made me think I could pull this off?

I decided to pull up my big girl panties and get my head in check. I had trained well, my body was strong, and I had a clean slate with a new starting line. I wanted to finish Leadville really bad. I wanted to have my qualifiers for Badwater and I didn’t care what that guy at the AC trail work said to me anymore. What did he know?

So, two weeks later, I started Leadville and DNF’d at mile 60. This time I missed a cut off, but I gave it all I had. I never quit, I never gave up and I pushed until I was told I was no longer allowed to continue. I felt better about this DNF, but I wasn’t OK with it. Maybe that guy was right. Maybe I had no idea what I was doing, and maybe I had bit off more than I could chew. The cold hard fact is that I had 2 DNF’s 2 weeks apart and it stung.

But I didn’t quit, and I didn’t give up. EC100 and Chimera 100 were coming up and I needed those finishes. I trained hard, I trained smart, and I finished both.

I went on to run Badwater in 2014 and continued running long hard races. Each time I showed up, I never felt like I was a true Ultra Runner. Even after completing Badwater, I still wondered when I would become a “real runner”.

It wasn’t until November 2016 at the Mt. Gaoligong Ultra in China that I finally realized that I belonged on the course. At that time, I already had completed Badwater twice, the Grand Slam of 100 Milers, and many other difficult 100 mile races. I had won some and placed at others. I was close to dead last at a few as well. The difference from my failures at AC100 and Leadville compared to my success at the 100 milers I finished is that I simply believed in myself and my ability.

Starting the MGU 100 Miler race in China was magical. I was one of a few American women who made the trek 1/2 across the world for this inaugural event. It was an incredible honor to wear the US flag on my bib and to represent my country.

I stood there surrounded by some of the most talented athletes with running resumes and accomplishments that would blow your mind. I stood there and looked around and asked myself, “Why am I here? How did I get here?” Then I just started to soak it all in. I took some deep breaths and listened to the sounds of the drums that introduced us to the crowd around us as the heat of the fires burning in cauldrons at the start line warmed me. I began to tell myself in amazement that THIS WAS MY LIFE. I worked hard for this moment and I earned it.

As I ran, I went through many personal and emotional battles. I finally came to the conclusion, over the course of those 104 miles across the rugged hillside of Tengchong, that I belonged there. I finally, after many years, realized I was a “real runner.” I actually had been all along.

I was a real runner the day I laced up my shoes and decided I wanted to start a race. I belonged at every starting line even when others thought I had bit off more than I could chew. It is my journey, and I am proud of it. I am even more proud when I look back on it and how far I have come from those DNF’s at AC100 and Leadville early in my ultra running career. It is my story.

With every misstep, I found my way to greater success. With each mistake, I learned something new about myself. With every tear and outcry of heartache and disappointment, I was awarded with greater victories down the road I could have never imagined at the onset of this journey.

I encourage you to set your goals high and follow your own dreams even when they scare you. Feel the fear, but do it anyway. They aren’t you, and they sure don’t know you like you know yourself.

Do hard things and then find even harder things to do.

And always remember…that you are a “REAL RUNNER!”

Andrea Kooiman
RIF #404

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Andrea Kooiman and Marylou Corino HURT 100

7 Miles from Glory: Marylou Corino’s HURT 100 Redemption

7 MILES
Marylou Corino’s HURT 100 Redemption

7 miles- a run I can often do in the morning before work or even squeeze in during my one hour lunch break.  I fell 7 miles short of finishing the HURT 100 back in Jan 2017.  That was my first DNF (did not finish).   I took not finishing it quite personally. I have finished everything I had started up until that point and couldn’t leave this unfinished. I am just not wired that way.

As soon as I returned home, I was determined to go back in 2018 to finish it. Needless to say those 7 miles would fuel what would be my most intense year of training to date. In order to succeed the following year, I had to examine what didn’t work the year before.  I figured out three things:  a) I needed to move faster (especially at night). b) I needed to work on my hiking skills and c) I needed to stay fueled and hydrated properly during the race.

photo: Augusto Castro

I really wanted to find terrain that would mimic the race course as much as possible. Anyone who has done HURT knows that is not an easy task to replicate that twisted and grueling landscape.  The HURT 100 boasts 24,500 feet of climbing. It consists exclusively of technical, single track trail on surfaces that include (HUGE) roots, rocks and soil in a wide range of conditions from sun baked clay to mud of varying depth. Sudden hairpin turns and steep inclines of up to approximately two miles in length are a common occurrence. Very few sections of the course can be run with a consistent stride for more than several hundred yards at a time. There are a total of 20 stream crossings.

The Bruce Trail, here in Ontario, is filled with rocks and roots so I spent a lot of time on this trail getting my feet used to that type of terrain.  As a flatlander, I needed to improvise on trying to get some good climbing in. I spent hours doing hill repeats, climbing on the treadmill, stair climbing, and hill work on the elliptical. In addition, I was trying to make the legs even stronger through strength training. I spent morning, lunch hours, afternoons after work and at night getting the training in. Most days were double or triple workouts. I wasn’t even sure I was in the race yet.  (The lottery didn’t happen until August).

Simply put, from February to August I was training for a race I wasn’t even sure I was going to run. I woke up some mornings wanting to do nothing but sleep. But in the corner of my eye I could see the HURT 100 shirt from 2017 hanging in my closet (never worn) and that was enough for me to get up and out of bed. It’s important to ALWAYS remember why you are doing something so you continue to chase it.

I ran quite a few races in 2017 but I felt the following three would help immensely in getting me ready for the HURT 100. I signed up for the Cruel Jewel 100 (close to 110miles) , Barkley Fall Classic ( “50km”) and the Grindstone 100 In Virginia. All three were challenging in different ways. I spent 2 nights completing both hundreds and the BFC had its own unique climbs. I didn’t run any of them fast but with each race I was developing my mental strength and stamina which I knew I would need to complete the HURT 100.

Fast Forward to Saturday January 13, 2018. I was at the start line of my second attempt of the HURT 100. Dan, my husband, was right there by my side.  He has and continues to be my biggest fan and supporter.

As I was trying to soak in this second chance, I couldn’t help but feel nervous. So many hours of hard work and sacrifice brought me to this moment.  I knew there was nothing more I could have done. I had a great support system at the race and back home.  The race started and all those nerves went away.  I broke up the race in parts, just focusing on getting from one aid station to the next.  I finished the first loop in just under 5 hours and 20 minutes. I am not sure even now if that was too fast. All I knew was that I needed to be faster than last year. The course was just as beautiful and tough as I remembered it.

photo: Kalani Pascual

I had a quick bite to eat, changed socks, and started loop 2. It definitely got warmer and I seemed to be getting hungrier faster. I decided to eat every 45 minutes and eat large quantities of food at the aid stations because at HURT there is always a monster climb after every aid station. I got through loop 2 before dark and it was here where I took a few minutes to change clothes, devour a monster cheeseburger from Dan, and get ready for the night portion that would cover the jungle during loop 3.

Last year loop 3 was my race breaker. I lost so much time in the dark that I started loop 4 chasing cutoffs the rest of the race.   I made sure this year to have a good headlamp and flashlight and neither disappointed.  Navigating HURT during the day is hard but having to navigate it during the dark feels like you are running a completely different and more sinister race.  I finished loop 3,  1.5 hours faster than last year. This gave me a huge confidence booster although I wasn’t celebrating just yet.  I still had 40 miles to complete.  I was also very lucky to have shared some good miles with Joshua Holmes. We were never more than 15 minutes apart. I do believe without a doubt he helped push me through that third loop.

I was quite sleepy during loop 4 but needed to stay awake and focused on the trail to avoid a fall or injury. I never felt alone during the race. It always encouraging to see runners on the course and every aid station was lively and celebratory no matter the time.  I got to see Andrea Kooiman not only at the Nu’uanu aid station where she was volunteering but also at night when she paced Joshua. She had DNF’d and time out at mile 93 the year before I did. She returned last year to successfully finish the race. Our paths crossed many times and this always lifted my spirits.  I could often hear her from as far as 2 miles away. The ‘Nu’uanu Boom-Box’ as they called her on the trail.

Both Andrea and Joshua were a great source of support for me as I got ready during 2017 to attempt HURT the second time around. We bonded at several events including the Badwater Salton Sea where we were a 3 person team that had to stay together for all 81 miles.

During the 4th loop (80 miles in) I saw my second sunrise and finished that loop leaving about 9 hours to complete the fifth and final one. I just needed to keep moving to get that buckle. This is where the extra ounce of mental toughness I developed during training and running harder trail races came in.  A pacer ran with me for about 14 or 15 miles and this made the time go by somewhat quickly.  As I left the Nu’uanu aid station at mile 93 (one last time and with time to spare!)  I felt overwhelmingly joyous. I was going to complete those 7 miles that I couldn’t complete last year.  Although it was still 7 difficult miles to finish the race, it felt like a victory lap of sorts. The past 12 months of hard work had paid off.

Coming into the HURT 100 start/finish area for the last time is a feeling I soon will not forget.  I lifted my hands up, rang the bell and kissed the sign in a time of 35:40:15. I had done it…all that hard work…redemption!

And as the sign says  “We wouldn’t want it to be easy.”  That’s good because I wouldn’t want it any other way.

Marylou Corino (RIF #411)
HURT 100 Mile Finisher
35:40:15
January 13-14, 2018

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Ila Brandli

Run It Fast’s Extreme Racer Standings (thru July 2017)

Ila Brandli

July was quite a bit slower than June bringing in 1,485.23 miles with a total for the year at 17,208.52 miles so far for 2017. This update is through the end of June. Half way through the year and check out how close the top two are!  Below are the ones leading the charge currently and it’s still too close at the top to tell what will happen. If you forgot to enter your race miles you still can and we will include them in the next update. Don’t forget to update your points for August as soon as your races are finished. Looking for races to enter? Be sure to check out the Run It Fast – Club Race Discounts in the Facebook group.

Leading the women is RIF #644 Ila Brandli with 1254.8 points. Second place, RIF #450 Patricia Klein with 901.3 points. Coming in third place is RIF #404 Andrea Kooiman with 743.2 points.

Leading the men is RIF #263 Denis McCarthy with 1200.6 points. Second place, RIF #638 Ken Fattmann with 1063.2 points. Coming in third place is RIF #279 George Southgate with 997.5 points.  

Here are the standings through July:

Extreme Racer Top Ten Leaderboard

  1. Ila Brandli – 1254.8 points (RIF #644)
  2. Denis McCarthy – 1200.6  points (RIF #263)
  3. Ken Fattmann – 1063.2 points (RIF #638)
  4. George Southgate – 997.5 points (RIF #279)
  5. Patricia Klein – 901.3 points (RIF #450)
  6. Joshua Holmes – 778.1 points (RIF #1)
  7. Andrea Kooiman – 743.2 points (RIF #404)
  8. Karen Vollan – 736.2 points (RIF #525)
  9. Teal Clark – 623.3 points (RIF #473)
  10. Shane Tucker – 580.2 points (RIF #337)

 

Extreme Racer Women’s Leaderboard

  1. Ila Brandli – 1254.8 points (RIF #644)
  2. Patricia Klein – 901.3 points (RIF #450)
  3. Andrea Kooiman – 743.2 points (RIF #404)
  4. Karen Vollan – 736.2 points (RIF #525)
  5. Teal Clark – 623.3 points (RIF #473)
  6. Marylou Corino – 566 points (RIF #410)
  7. Cheryl Bryll – 413.3 points (RIF #432)
  8. Greta Reed – 396.6 points (RIF #643)
  9. Tiffani Glass – 308.2 points (RIF #328)
  10. Robin Brunet – 276.46 points (RIF #564)
  11. Diane Bolton – 259.2 points (RIF #159)
  12. Kit Brazier – 240.2 points (RIF #548)
  13. Christy Bowers – 193.3 points (RIF #60)
  14. Audrena Liu – 169.1 points (RIF #463)
  15. Taleighda Crowe – 120.4 points (RIF #628)
  16. Jill Williams – 115.7 points (RIF #521)
  17. Aimee Shilling – 101 points (RIF #418)
  18. Marj Mitchell – 93 points (RIF #4)
  19. Candice Graciano – 59.6 points (RIF #545)
  20. Juleann Roberts – 52.16 points (RIF #623)
  21. Michelle Talbott – 37.5 points (RIF #527)
  22. Sue Peterson – 24.8 points (RIF #648)
  23. Leslie Harwell – 16.2 points (RIF #417)


Extreme Racer Men’s Leaderboard

  1. Denis McCarthy  –  1200.64 points (RIF #263)
  2. Ken Fattmann  –  1063.2 points (RIF #638)
  3. George Southgate  –  997.5 points (RIF #279)
  4. Joshua Holmes  –  778.1 points (RIF #1)
  5. Shane Tucker –  580.2 points (RIF #337)
  6. Jeremy Reed  –  569.5 points (RIF #642)
  7. Calix Fattmann  –  561.2 points (RIF #653)
  8. John Kent Leighton –  545.9 points (RIF #190)
  9. Seth Crowe –  445.1 points (RIF #541)
  10. Steve Acciarito  –  400.7 points (RIF #607)
  11. Michael SK Mortensen  –  305.5 points (RIF #553)
  12. Mike Samuelson –  293.2 points (RIF #282)
  13. Eric Hunziker –  258.6 points (RIF #660)
  14. Jean Aponte –  247.2 points (RIF #659)
  15. Chewey BK Lam –  191.3 points (RIF #679)
  16. Aaron Braunstein  –  166.8 points (RIF #355)
  17. Aaron Smith –  161.1 points (RIF #640)
  18. Steven Smith  –  150 points (RIF #387)
  19. Jared Matsunaga  –  137.2 points (RIF #665)
  20. Stewart Crouch –  120.3 points (RIF #89)
  21. Michael Dasalla –  96.9points (RIF #411)
  22. Shane Beck  –  72.4 points (RIF #585)
  23. Darrell Richardson  –  66.3 points (RIF #625)
  24. Derek Tinnin  –  50 points (RIF #637)
  25. Charles Roberts  –  41.96 points (RIF #622)
  26. David Essary  –  6.2 points (RIF #475)


You don’t have to be fast. But you’d better be fearless.” ~ Christopher McDougall

[Extreme Racer points are awarded per each racing mile completed. Example: marathon = 26.2 points, half marathon 13.1 points, etc.

 

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Run It Fast’s Extreme Racer Standings (thru January 2017)

Run It Fast’s Extreme Racer Standings (thru January 2017)

Vol State Day 2 Road Photo by Julia Beavers - Run It Fast

It’s a new year and a new Extreme Racer Competition! January has started us off with 1,346.72 miles for the beginning of 2017. This update is through the end of January. Who will be our 2017 winner? Below are the ones leading the charge so far and it’s anyone’s to win. If you forgot to enter your race miles you still can and we will include them in the next update. Don’t forget to update your points for February as soon as your races are finished. Looking for races to enter? Be sure to check out the Run It Fast – Club Race Discounts in the Facebook group.

Leading the women is RIF #525 Karen Vollan with 257.4 points. Second place, RIF #432 Cheryl Bryll with 131 points. Coming in third place is RIF #404 Andrea Kooiman with 113.1 points.

Leading the men is RIF #263 Denis McCarthy with 157.2 points. Second place, RIF #638 Ken Fattmann  with 147.2 points. Coming in third place is RIF #279 George Southgate with 145.8 points..

Here are the standings through January:

Extreme Racer Top Ten Leaderboard

  1. Karen Vollan – 257.4 points (RIF #525)
  2. Denis McCarthy – 157.2 points (RIF #263)
  3. Ken Fattmann – 147.2 points (RIF #638)
  4. George Southgate – 145.8 points (RIF #279)
  5. Cheryl Bryll – 131 points (RIF #432)
  6. Andrea Kooiman – 113.1 points (RIF #404)
  7. Teal Clark – 107.2 points (RIF #473)
  8. Joshua Holmes – 50 points (RIF #1)
  9. Shane Tucker – 44.1 points (RIF #337)
  10. Tiffani Glass – 39 points (RIF #328)

 

Extreme Racer Women’s Leaderboard

  1. Karen Vollan – 257.4 points (RIF #525)
  2. Cheryl Bryll – 131 points (RIF #432)
  3. Andrea Kooiman – 113.1 points (RIF #404)
  4. Teal Clark – 107.2 points (RIF #473)
  5. Tiffani Glass – 39 points (RIF #328)
  6. Robin Brunet – 31 points (RIF #564)
  7. Kit Brazier – 26.2 points (RIF #548)
  8. Christy Bowers – 16.2 points (RIF #60)
  9. Michelle Talbott – 8 points (RIF #527)
  10. Juleann Roberts – 4.96 points (RIF #623)

 


Extreme Racer Men’s Leaderboard

  1. Denis McCarthy – 157.2 points (RIF #263)
  2. Ken Fattmann – 147.2 points (RIF #638)
  3. George Southgate – 145.8 points (RIF #279)
  4. Joshua Holmes – 50 points (RIF #1)
  5. Shane Tucker – 44.1 points (RIF #337)
  6. Aaron Braunstein – 26.2 points (RIF #355)
  7. Darrell Richardson – 22.2 points (RIF #625)
  8. Steve Acciarito – 15 points (RIF #607)
  9. Charles Roberts – 4.96 points (RIF #622)

Only those who risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.~T.S. Eliot

[Extreme Racer points are awarded per each racing mile completed. Example: marathon = 26.2 points, half marathon 13.1 points, etc.]

 

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George Southgate photo by Tim Rogan – Run It Fast

Run It Fast’s Extreme Racer Standings (Thru May 2015)

George Southgate photo by Tim Rogan - Run It Fast

Since I am sitting here following the Western States Endurance Run 100 progress (where several RIF members, including RIF #1 and founder Joshua Holmes, are laying down the miles and getting close to the finish line), now is as good of a time as any to tally up the Extreme Racer points for the year through May.

Last year’s winner has joined the pack this month and entered his miles for the year. However, I am surprised to see that he is not in first place so far. Leading the way is RIF #279 George Southgate with 768.6 points. Second place is held by RIF #190 John Kent Leighton with 744.15 points. Last year’s winner, RIF #121 Ed Ettinghausen takes third place with 704.02 points.

RIF #159 Diane Bolton is in first for the women with 395.6 points. Following very close behind is RIF #450 Patricia Klein with 394.4 points. Third place is held by RIF #358 Belinda Young with 393.1 points. With a 2.5 point difference between first and third place, one race could completely rearrange the order of placings here for next month.

Here are the Extreme Racer standings through May:

Extreme Racer Top 10 Leaderboard:

1. George Southgate – 768.6 (RIF #279)
2. John Kent Leighton – 744.15 (RIF #190)
3. Ed Ettinghausen – 704.02 (RIF #121)
4. Joshua Holmes – 633.8 (RIF #1)
5. Deo Jaravata – 598.5 (RIF #333)
6. Diane Bolton – 395.6 (RIF #159)
7. Patricia Klein – 394.4 (RIF #450)
8. Belinda Young – 393.1 (RIF #358)
9. Andrea Kooiman – 352.3 (RIF #404)
10. Steven Smith – 335.2 (RIF #335.2)

Extreme Racer Male Leaderboard:

1. George Southgate – 768.6 (RIF #279)
2. John Kent Leighton – 744.15 (RIF #190)
3. Ed Ettinghausen – 704.02 (RIF #121)
4. Joshua Holmes – 633.8 (RIF #1)
5. Deo Jaravata – 598.5 (RIF #333)
6. Steven Smith – 335.2 (RIF #387)
7. Shane Tucker – 294.9 (RIF #337)
8. Denis McCarthy – 288.2 (RIF #263)
9. Jeff Liu – 284.1 (RIF #275)
10. Chris Baker – 283.2 (RIF #437)
11. Arland Blanton – 195.8 (RIF #290)
12. John Sotomayor – 190.2 (RIF #393)
13. Ben Herron – 159.8 (RIF #408)
14. Charlie Taylor – 157.2 (RIF #353)
15. Jeff Van Demark – 114.9 (RIF #322)
16. Michael Dasalla – 112.7 (RIF #411)
17. Nathan Bass – 109.3 (RIF #174)
18. Brian Recore – 100 (RIF #395)
19. Stephen Griffin – 97.9 (RIF #48)
20. David Mickelsen – 92.5 (RIF #164)
21. Dennis Arriaga – 63.1 (RIF #140)
22. Mark Ogletree – 41.7 (RIF #247)
23. Robin Robbins – 35.64 (RIF #33)
24. Jeff Le – 31 (RIF #248)
25. Rick Glass – 8 (RIF #401)

Extreme Racer Female Leaderboard

1. Diane Bolton – 395.6 (RIF #159)
2. Patricia Klein – 394.4 (RIF #450)
3. Belinda Young – 393.1 (RIF #358)
4. Andrea Kooiman – 352.3 (RIF #404)
5. Suzanne Michelson – 306.1 (RIF #280)
6. Christa Baker – 283.2 (RIF #436)
7. Angie Whitworth Pace – 272.7 (RIF #447)
8. Amanda Staggs – 270.9 (RIF #210)
9. Marylou Corino – 260.2 (RIF #410)
10. Nicole Eldridge – 251.6 (RIF #446)
11. Cheryl Bryll – 179.9 (RIF #432)
12. Kim Crowe – 156.3 (RIF #245)
13. Christy Bowers – 149.9 (RIF #60)
14. Heather Zeigler – 131 (RIF #246)
15. Tiffani Glass – 128.3 (RIF #328)
16. Alicia Eno – 127.2 (RIF #126)
17. Lisa Gonzales – 121 (RIF #5)
18. Ines Cooper – 120.5 (RIF #448)
19. Leslie Harwell – 120.2 (RIF #417)
20. Christy Scott – 119.2 (RIF #231)
21. Aimee Shilling – 105 (RIF #418)
22. Julia Beavers – 94.2 (RIF #339)
23. Donna Dworak – 92 (RIF #310)
24. Heather Shoemaker – 91.7 (RIF #44)
25. Jennifer Hatcher – 81.7 (RIF #323)
26. Marj Mitchell – 68.8 (RIF #4)
27. Shannon Miller – 67.4 (RIF #338)
28. Erin Goetz – 57.9 (RIF #443)
29. Sue Stephens-Wright – 26.2 (RIF #321)
30. Helen McMullin – 26.2 (RIF #390)
31. Laura Ann Evanoika – 13.1 (RIF #433)
32. Debra Jacildo – 3.1 (RIF #98)

June has been a busy month for Run It Fast members, especially with Run It Fast’s own Jackal Marathon series, which ran for 5 consecutive days during the third week in June, so I’m sure these numbers will increase dramatically and placings will change all over the board. As always, Run It Fast members continue to inspire and amaze by pushing their boundaries and testing their limits. I look forward to seeing what the rest of the year holds for this incredible group of determined runners.

[Extreme Racer points are rewarded per each racing mile completed. Example: marathon = 26.2 points, half marathon 13.1 points, etc.]

photo: Tim Rogan

Posted in Extreme Racer, Running, THE CLUBComments (0)

Deo Jaravata and Joshua Holmes at Nanny Goat 2015 – Run It Fast

Run It Fast’s Extreme Racer Standings (Thru April 2015)

Deo Jaravata and Joshua Holmes at Nanny Goat 2015 - Run It Fast
RIF #333 Deo Jaravata and RIF #1 Joshua Holmes at Nanny Goat

Happy Memorial Day weekend! I hope everyone had a great, safe time grilling, playing on the water, and of course, running.

This club and all the incredible people in it are a constant inspiration and amazement me, especially watching how the Extreme Racer standings change each month. More members continue to participate and the points continue to rise, as runners battle for the top spots.

Leading the men is RIF #279 George Southgate with 588 points. Second place is held by RIF #190 John Kent Leighton with 547.45 points. Coming in third is RIF #1 Joshua Holmes with 492.6 points.

Our female leader is RIF #404 Andrea Kooiman with 352.3 points. Second place is held by RIF #450 Patricia Klein with 342 points. Coming in third is RIF #159 Diane Bolton with 321.2 points.

Here are the 2015 Extreme Racer standings through April:

Extreme Racer Top 10 Leaderboard:

1. George Southgate – 588 (RIF #279)
2. John Kent Leighton – 547.45 (RIF #190)
3. Joshua Holmes – 492.6 (RIF #1)
4. Deo Jaravata – 389.4 (RIF #333)
5. Andrea Kooiman – 352.3 (RIF #404)
6. Patricia Klein – 342 (RIF #450)
7. Steven Smith – 335.2 (RIF #387)
8. Diane Bolton – 328.2 (RIF #159)
9. Belinda Young – 301.4 (RIF #358)
10. Denis McCarthy – 288.2 (RIF #263)

Extreme Racer Male Leaderboard

1. George Southgate – 588 (RIF #279)
2. John Kent Leighton – 547.45 (RIF #190)
3. Joshua Holmes – 492.6 (RIF #1)
4. Deo Jaravata – 389.4 (RIF #333)
5. Steven Smith – 335.2 (RIF #387)
6. Denis McCarthy – 288.2 (RIF #263)
7. Shane Tucker – 222 (RIF #337)
8. Arland Blanton – 195.8 (RIF #290)
9. John Sotomayor – 190.2 (RIF #393)
10. Jeff Liu – 181 (RIF #275)
11. Chris Baker – 171 (RIF #437)
12. Charlie Taylor – 157.2 (RIF #353)
13. Ben Herron – 119.8 (RIF #408)
14. Michael Dasalla – 112.7 (RIF #411)
15. Nathan Bass – 106.2 (RIF #174)
16. Brian Recore – 100 (RIF #395)
17. Stephen Griffin – 97.9 (RIF #395)
18. David Mickelsen – 92.5 (RIF #164)
19. Jeff Van Demark – 86.3 (RIF #322)
20. Dennis Arriaga – 63.1 (RIF #140)
21. Mark Ogletree – 41.7 (RIF #247)
22. Robin Robbins – 35.64 (RIF #33)
23. Jeff Le – 31 (RIF #248)
24. Rick Glass – 8 (RIF #401)

Extreme Racer Female Leaderboard

1. Andrea Kooiman – 352.3 (RIF #404)
2. Patricia Klein – 342 (RIF #450)
3. Diane Bolton – 328.2 (RIF #159
4. Belinda Young – 301.4 (RIF #358)
5. Suzanne Michelson – 248.9 (RIF 280)
6. Marylou Corino – 229.2 (RIF #410)
7. Angie Whitworth Pace – 220.3 (RIF #447)
8. Amanda Staggs – 203.7 (RIF #210)
9. Christa Baker – 171 (RIF #436)
10. Nicole Eldridge – 146.2 (RIF #446)
11. Christy Bowers – 136.8 9 (RIF #60)
12. Heather Zeigler – 131 (RIF #246)
13. Ines Cooper – 120.5 (RIF #448)
14. Leslie Harwell – 120.2 (RIF #417)
15. Kim Crowe – 115.1 (RIF #245)
16. Aimee Shilling – 105 (RIF #418
17. Tiffani Glass – 95.9 (RIF #328)
18. Christy Scott – 93 (RIF #231)
19. Donna Dworak – 92 (RIF #310)
20. Heather Shoemaker – 91.7 (RIF #44)
21. Lisa Gonzales – 85.3 (RIF #5)
22. Jennifer Hatcher – 81.7 (RIF #323)
23. Marj Mitchell – 59.5 (RIF #4)
24. Alicia Eno – 39.3 (RIF #126)
25. Erin Goetz – 35.5 (RIF #443)
26. Shannon Miller – 26.2 (RIF #338)
27. Sue Stephens-Wright – 26.2 (RIF #321)
28. Helen McMullin – 26.2 (RIF #390)
29. Julia Beavers – 15.5 (RIF #339)
30. Laura Ann Evanoika – 13.1 (RIF #433)

So many members have already accomplished such greats things this year, and the year isn’t even halfway over. There will be so many more PRs, PLs and PGs (personal goals) set and I cannot wait to hear about them all. You are all exceptional. Keep being you.

[Extreme Racer points are rewarded per each racing mile completed. Example: marathon = 26.2 points, half marathon 13.1 points, etc.]

Posted in Extreme Racer, Running, THE CLUBComments (0)

Deo Jaravata, Yolanda Holder, Andrea Kooiman, Joshua Holmes before the Catalina Eco Marathon

Run It Fast’s Extreme Racer Standings (Thru March 2015)

Deo Jaravata, Yolanda Holder, Andrea Kooiman, Joshua Holmes before the Catalina Eco Marathon

Spring has sprung, and runners are starting to come out of their burrows. No matter where you call home, runners and walkers alike are covering roads and sidewalks in their running shoes with their friends, pets and strollers in tow, enjoying the warm sunshine and doing their best to shed a few winter pounds. Whether you are an indoor winter runner or a year-round outdoor vet, race mileage is beginning to accrue and, with it, points. Extreme Racer points, that is.

With Run It Fast’s continual growth of new members, the Extreme Racer competition already has many new competitors than last year, and I enjoy seeing how the change in competition shakes up the standings. Particularly, there are several more women who are taking part this year. Therefore, I will start this post with the women’s leaderboard.

Run It Fast Extreme Racer Leaders

In first place for the women is RIF #404 Andrea Kooiman with 352.3 points. In second place is the female winner for 2014, RIF #159 Diane Bolton with 328.2 points. Third place is held by RIF #280 Suzanne Michelson with 235.8

Leading the men is RIF #190 John Kent Leighton with 485.45 points. Second place is held by RIF #279 George Southgate with 446 points. In third place is RIF founder and RIF #1 Joshua Holmes with 392.6 points.

Here are the 2015 Extreme Racer standings through March:

Extreme Racer Top 10 Leaderboard:

1. John Kent Leighton – 485.45 (RIF #190)
2. George Southgate – 446 (RIF #279)
3. Joshua Holmes – 392.6 (RIF #1)
4. Andrea Kooiman – 352.3 (RIF #404)
5. Diane Bolton – 328.2 (RIF #159)
6. Steven Smith – 269.7 (RIF #3870
7. Denis McCarthy –  235.8 (RIF #263)
8. Suzanne Michelson – 235.8 (RIF #280)
9. Belinda Young – 231.6 (RIF #358)
10. Amanda Staggs – 203.7 (RIF #210)

Extreme Racer Female Leaderboard

1. Andrea Kooiman – 352.3 (RIF #404)
2. Diane Bolton – 328.2 (RIF #159)
3. Suzanne Michelson – 235.8 (RIF #280)
4. Belinda Young – 231.6 (RIF #358)
5. Amanda Staggs – 203.7 (RIF #210)
6. Angie Whitworth Pace – 194.1 (RIF #447)
7. Christa Baker – 171 (RIF #436)
8. Patricia Klein – 145.5 (RIF #450)
9. Heather Zeigler – 131 (RIF #246)
10. Ines Cooper – 120.5 (RIF #448)
11. Leslie Harwell – 120.2 (RIF #417)
12. Kim Crowe – 115.1 (RIF #245)
13. Marylou Corino – 114.7 (RIF #410)
14. Christy Bowers – 100.6 (RIF #60)
15. Christy Scott – 93 (RIF #231)
16. Donna Dworak – 92 (RIF #310)
17. Heather Shoemaker – 91.7 (RIF #44)
18. Jennifer Hatcher – 81.7 (RIF #323)
19. Lisa Gonzales – 77.9 (RIF #5)
20.Tiffani Glass – 69.7 (RIF #328)
21. Aimee Shilling – 65.1 (RIF #418)
22. Marj Mitchell – 29.3 (RIF #4)
23. Sue Stephens-Wright – 26.2 (RIF #321)
24. Shannon Miller – 26.2 (RIF #338)
25. Helen McMullen – 26.2 (RIF #390)
26. Erin Goetz – 19.3 (RIF #443)
27. Julia Beavers – 15.5 (RIF #339)
28. Laura Ann Evanoika – 13.1 (RIF #433)

Extreme Racer Male Leaderboard

1. John Kent Leighton – 485.45 (RIF #190)
2. George Southgate – 446 (RIF #190)
3. Joshua Holmes – 392.6 (RIF #1)
4. Steven Smith – 269.7 (RIF #387)
5. Denis McCarthy – 235.8 (RIF #263)
6. Shane Tucker – 187.9 (RIF #337)
7. Arland Blanton – 183.4 (RIF #290)
8. Jeff Liu – 181 (RIF #275)
9. Chris Baker – 171 (RIF #437)
10. Charlie Taylor – 157.2 (RIF #353)
11. John Sotomayor – 140.2 (RIF #393)
12. Nathan Bass – 103.1 (RIF #174)
13. Brian Recore – 100 (RIF #395)
14. David Mickelsen – 92.5 (RIF 164)
15. Michael Dasalla – 83.4 (RIF #411)
16. Dennis Arriaga – 63.1 (RIF #140)
17. Jeff Van Demark – 61 (RIF #322)
18. Mark Ogletree – 41.7 (RIF #247)
19. Ben Herron – 39.3 (RIF #408)
20. Jeff Le – 31 (RIF #248)
21. Robin Robbins – 22.54 (RIF #33)
22. Rick Glass – 8 (RIF #401)

This year will hold so much in store for members of Run It Fast all over the globe, as the club continues to grow and runners continue doing what they love to do; run. With every mile, every step you take, you inspire someone. Even if you don’t know it. Continue to push your boundaries and be amazed with the outcome.

[Extreme Racer points are rewarded per each racing mile completed. Example: marathon = 26.2 points, half marathon 13.1 points, etc.]

Posted in Extreme Racer, Running, THE CLUBComments (0)



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